Search results for: “travel”

Posted in Behind the News

Q&A: AP Travel Editor Beth Harpaz

, by Erin Madigan White

Beth Harpaz oversees The Associated Press’ global coverage of travel, keeping it practical, on-trend and authoritative. Here, she previews a number of new columns debuting this month and explains why AP offers the best “travel perks”:

Posted in Behind the News

How data journalism tools localized Trump’s travel ban

, by Lauren Easton

A staff memo by State Government Editor Tom Verdin describes how, in the chaotic days that followed President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration, a data journalist helped AP member news organizations and customers “localize a story of international significance”:

Posted in Industry Insights

Digging into data journalism

, by Lauren Easton

With a new data journalism chapter in the 2017 AP Stylebook, journalists across all beats are able to obtain guidance on acquiring, evaluating, reproducing and reporting on data.

Posted in Behind the News

Scrambling to secure video exclusives of traveling North Korean official

, by Lauren Easton

Ahead of an announcement by President Donald Trump that a top North Korean official would travel to the U.S. for talks about an upcoming summit between the two countries, a sharp-eyed AP journalist spotted Kim Yong Chol en route and set off a worldwide scramble.

Posted in Behind the News

‘Fishing for photos’ in Northwest Passage

, by Lauren Easton

Aboard an icebreaker sailing through the Arctic Circle’s Northwest Passage, AP photographer David Goldman captured striking images of the jagged icescape left behind.

Posted in Behind the News

From Hollywood to Hong Kong: AP covers the world of entertainment

, by Erin Madigan White

Global Entertainment and Lifestyles Editor Nekesa Mumbi Moody oversees text and visual journalists based in New York, London, Hong Kong, Nashville and Los Angeles. Her staff covers movies, music, television, video games, fashion, food, travel and events including the Emmys, Grammys and Fashion Week. Ahead of the 87th Academy Awards on Sunday, Feb. 22, the well-wired reporter and editor pulls back the curtain on AP’s entertainment operation and explains how her team plans to cover entertainment’s biggest night:

Posted in Behind the News

Reporter provides rare view inside Coke

, by Paul Colford

One top AP editor said the story “sent dominoes tumbling in all directions.”

Business reporter Candice Choi obtained stunning emails that showed Coca-Cola Co. was a guiding force behind a nonprofit group founded to fight obesity. “Coke helped pick the group’s leaders, edited its mission statement and suggested articles and videos for its website,” Choi wrote.

Posted in Announcements

Some guidance on Ebola and enterovirus coverage

, by Tom Kent

Yesterday we distributed some guidance to our staff on coverage of Ebola and enterovirus, two diseases much in the news.

Posted in Behind the News

Spain train crash: How a journalist’s quick thinking led to vital info

, by Erin Madigan White

It was Spain’s worst rail disaster in 70 years. An express train careened off the tracks in a jumble of flying steel, killing 79 people. In chaos that followed one key question emerged almost instantly: Was the train driver speeding? Initial but unsourced reports indicated he was. Video of the crash from a security camera seemed to show this. But as in the immediate aftermath of most disasters, precise, reliable information was very hard to come by.

Posted in Behind the News

Trudging through mud to get the shot

, by Lauren Easton

As search crews in California look for victims of this week’s deadly mudslides in Montecito, AP journalists are on the ground covering the rescue efforts and the destruction left behind.  

Posted in Announcements

AP calls for greater White House access in New York Times op-ed

, by Erin Madigan White

UPDATED: Dec. 11, 2013

Santiago Lyon, AP vice president and director of photography, wrote this opinion piece published in The New York Times: Obama’s Orwellian Image Control.

Posted in Behind the News

How one Cuba scoop led to another

, by Erin Madigan White

In a memo to staff, Senior Managing Editor Michael Oreskes hails the AP reporting team from around the world who worked together to break an important story about the U.S. government’s secret activities in Cuba: