AP reacts to alteration of photo

Mideast Syria

Above is the original photo taken by Contreras and below is the altered version that AP distributed.

The Associated Press has ended its ties with Narciso Contreras, a freelance photographer who has worked for AP in the Middle East, following his recent admission that he altered a photo that he took last September in Syria.

The action involved the removal of a video camera seen in a corner of a frame showing a Syrian opposition fighter taking cover during a clash with government forces. The alteration violates AP’s News Values & Principles. This code of AP standards says: “AP pictures must always tell the truth. We do not alter or digitally manipulate the content of a photograph in any way … No element should be digitally added to or subtracted from any photograph.”

“AP’s reputation is paramount and we react decisively and vigorously when it is tarnished by actions in violation of our ethics code,” said Vice President and Director of Photography Santiago Lyon. “Deliberately removing elements from our photographs is completely unacceptable and we have severed all relations with the freelance photographer in question. He will not work for the AP again in any capacity.”

Contreras was among the five photojournalists whose images of the Syrian civil war in 2012 earned AP the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography in the spring of 2013. The image that he subsequently altered was taken on Sept. 29, 2013.

AP has notified the Pulitzer board that an image taken a year after the prize was awarded was flawed, but that none of the images in AP’s prize entry, including six by Contreras, were compromised in any way. After re-examining nearly 500 other photos by Contreras distributed by AP, Lyon said he was satisfied that no other alteration took place. However, consistent with AP’s standards and policies, all of Contreras’ photos for AP will no longer be available for commercial licensing.

AP’s story about the incident can be read here.

Pausing to see the world

In fast-paced Tokyo, a pause will be rewarded with “A View of Daily Life” around the world.

A man walks in front of the entrance to the AP photo exhibition at the Gyoko-dori Underground Gallery in Tokyo, Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

A man walks in front of the entrance to the AP photo exhibition at the Gyoko-dori Underground Gallery in Tokyo, Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

“A View of Daily Life” is a display of Associated Press photos from 31 countries newly installed in Gyoko-dori Underground Gallery, located in Marunouchi, one of Tokyo’s central business and entertainment hubs.

The Japanese paper Sankei Express has reported on the exhibit, which runs through April 22. Admission is free.

The new exhibit follows another international photo show that AP presented in the gallery in 2012-2013.

A man looks at a photograph at the AP Photo exhibition at Tokyo Station gallery in Tokyo, Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

A man looks at a photograph at the AP photo exhibition at the Gyoko-dori Underground Gallery gallery in Tokyo, Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

Guttenfelder is TIME’s Instagram Photographer of the Year

David Guttenfelder, AP’s chief photographer in Asia, can add TIME magazine’s Instagram Photographer of the Year to the myriad accolades he’s received throughout his career.

In this January 15, 2013 photo taken with an iPod Touch and originally posted to Instagram from Pyongyang, a woman walks on a Pyongyang street in front of the pyramid-shaped 105-story Ryugyong Hotel, which North Korea began building in 1987 and it is yet to be complete. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

In this January 15, 2013 photo taken with an iPod Touch and originally posted to Instagram from Pyongyang, a woman walks on a Pyongyang street in front of the pyramid-shaped 105-story Ryugyong Hotel, which North Korea began building in 1987 and it is yet to be complete. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

Guttenfelder’s images snapped on Instagram, including many taken during his visits to North Korea, generated particular fascination in 2013. In fact, Guttenfelder’ work on Instagram was featured by media outlets ranging from the CBS Evening News to National Geographic to Mashable to Wired.

His Instagram feed has more than 235,000 followers. That’s a number that’s likely to grow with endorsements such as this one from WNYC radio, which tweeted: “PSA: Follow [David Guttenfelder] on Instagram, he’s posting amazing photos from North Korea. http://wny.cc/1bSzI4V  pic.twitter.com/Sx15rbVlzb.”

Working for the only western news organization with a full-time, multiformat bureau in Pyongyang, Guttenfelder has used his unprecedented access to bring a rare view of the reclusive country to the rest of the world, capturing what TIME called “striking, intimate pictures.”

“Nobody knows anything about [North Korea] and what it looks like,” Guttenfelder told TIME. “I feel like there’s a big opportunity and a big responsibility.”

Guttenfelder’s images are available via AP Images. Follow him on Instagram.

TIME names Muhammed Muheisen best wire photographer of 2013

Calling his work “indispensable for news outlets the world over,” TIME magazine today named Associated Press photographer Muhammed Muheisen the best wire photographer of 2013.

Pakistan's Chief Photographer Muhammed Muheisen shows Afghan refugee children how the camera works, in a poor neighborhood on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Monday, Oct. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Nathalie Bardou)

Pakistan’s Chief Photographer Muhammed Muheisen shows Afghan refugee children how the camera works, in a poor neighborhood on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Monday, Oct. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Nathalie Bardou)

Muheisen, who is based in Islamabad, has captured images of both daily life and of conflict in countries throughout the region. He’s won numerous awards throughout his career and was part of the team that earned the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography documenting the civil war in Syria.

“Viewers everywhere are richer for Muheisen’s compassion, his devotion to his craft and his unwavering, unblinking engagement with the lives and the issues around him,” TIME said.

The magazine also noted that his pictures have appeared more often than those from any other photographer this year in its LightBox “Pictures of the Week” feature.

TIME is not the only publication to highlight his tremendous work. New York Times “Lens” blog editor James Estrin recently tweeted that images by Muheisen had been featured 197 times.

“Muhammed is an extremely talented photographer who time after time manages to win the trust of his subjects in order to record scenes as though he were invisible,” said Santiago Lyon, AP vice president and director of photography. “His understanding and use of light is exquisite.”

TIME also noted the “outstanding work over the past 12 months” by AP photographers David Guttenfelder and Jerome Delay.

See a collection of Muheisen’s work on APImages.com, and watch him discuss his work in Syria.

‘Electronic shoe leather': How AP found, verified images of train crash

The following note to staff from Senior Managing Editor Michael Oreskes explains how AP sought and verified compelling visuals in the immediate aftermath of Sunday morning’s deadly train crash in New York:

The technology may be new but the goal is eternal: Get verifiable visuals and eyewitness accounts as quickly as possible when news breaks.

The AP accomplished just that after a Metro-North commuter train careened off the rails – thanks to fast and smart work by Caleb Jones of the Nerve Center, who harnessed social media to help AP tell the story of the deadly accident with photos, video, sound and text. Call it electronic shoe leather. Caleb tracked down sources and verified that they were who they said they were and had seen what they said they saw. He did it all with accuracy and speed.

Caleb Jones

Caleb Jones

First word of the Bronx derailment came shortly after the 7:20 a.m. incident, when Photos’ David Boe alerted the Nerve Center to a call from a former AP staffer who had heard scanner traffic. Jones first alerted the East Desk, then launched a search of social media.

He found that two nearby residents had posted pictures, and sent out Twitter messages to both: “Hello. Are you on the scene? Are you available to speak with The Associated Press?”

The first to respond, Rebecca Schwartz, did not have usable photos; Jones passed her along to the East Desk, and she provided the first eyewitness account of the derailment’s aftermath.

“You could see multiple train cars off of the rails, including one train car – I couldn’t tell from where I was whether it was right into the water or just out of the water,” she said.

Edwin Valero had posted a better photo, but the accident scene, as shot from his apartment window, was still largely obscured by trees. Jones asked him if he had more, and he did – from a better location on a nearby bridge.

Cars from a Metro-North passenger train are scattered after the train derailed in the Bronx neighborhood of New York, Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013. (AP Photo/Edwin Valero)

Cars from a Metro-North passenger train are scattered after the train derailed in the Bronx neighborhood of New York, Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013. (AP Photo/Edwin Valero)

The train, all of its eight cars knocked from the tracks, had stopped just short of the water. (Original eyewitness reports said cars appeared to be in the water, and that was corrected based in part on Valero’s photos). Strewn about like playthings, some of the cars were thrown on to their sides, trapping passengers until rescuers could pull them free.

Still, Jones wanted more. He asked Valero if he could safely return to his perch to shoot video, and he did. Valero’s subsequent interview with AP Radio also provided quotes for text and TV, and the video scenes he shot with his iPhone were used in the AP package.

Valero’s signature’s shot of the wreckage in the shape of a giant question mark led the AP coverage and was the most widely used image across online media from morning into the night, displayed prominently by The New York Times, the New York Post, The Boston Globe and The Guardian and other outlets even after news organizations had their own shooters in the Bronx.

And it provided the AP with crucial information before its reporters could get to the scene.

Said East Regional Editor Karen Testa: Caleb’s work “was extraordinary in securing compelling images that not only told the story visually but helped ensure we were accurate in describing the wreckage before we had boots on the ground.”

For his intrepid and determined use of social media, which put the AP ahead on a breaking story of wide interest, Caleb Jones wins this week’s $500 prize.

AP calls for greater White House access in New York Times op-ed

UPDATED: Dec. 11, 2013

Santiago Lyon, AP vice president and director of photography, wrote this opinion piece published in The New York Times: Obama’s Orwellian Image Control.
__

Nov. 21, 2013

The Associated Press today reiterated its call for greater access to President Barack Obama for photographers who cover the White House.

“Journalists are routinely being denied the right to photograph or videotape the President while he is performing his official duties,” said a letter delivered today to White House Press Secretary Jay Carney that was signed by AP and many other news organizations. “As surely as if they were placing a hand over a journalist’s camera lens, officials in this administration are blocking the public from having an independent view of important functions of the Executive Branch of government.”

The letter echoed concerns raised by AP since President Obama’s first days in office in 2009.

AP Vice President and Director of Photography Santiago Lyon underscored key points in the dispute:

AP Vice President and Director of Photography Santiago Lyon

AP Vice President and Director of Photography Santiago Lyon

What is The AP seeking?
The AP and other media organizations are seeking more regular photo access to the President in the Oval Office and elsewhere as he performs official duties or meets with staff. While photographers are granted some access to Oval Office meetings and other activities, it has decreased markedly under the Obama administration when compared to previous presidents. We believe we should have access to a wider selection of presidential events where we know access to be possible.

Don’t we already see photos of these occasions?
A small group of photographers and a videographer, collectively known as the “travel pool,” enjoys some access to the Oval Office and other presidential activities but increasingly the Obama administration labels events as “private” before then releasing official photos shot by White House photographers such as Pete Souza.

These images are posted on the White House Flickr page — http://www.flickr.com/photos/whitehouse — where they are available for free.

This July 1, 2013, screen grab from the Twitter Page of the official White House photographer, Pete Souza, shows a tweet featuring an image of President Barack Obama and his family listening to a tour guide inside Nelson Mandela's cell on Robben Island on June 30, 2013, in Cape Town, South Africa. The White House barred press photographers from this portion of the tour saying it was private, but then released their own photos of from Mandela's cell. (AP Photo/The White House)

This July 1, 2013, screen grab from the Twitter Page of the official White House photographer, Pete Souza, shows a tweet featuring an image of President Barack Obama and his family listening to a tour guide inside Nelson Mandela’s cell on Robben Island on June 30, 2013, in Cape Town, South Africa. The White House barred press photographers from this portion of the tour saying it was private, but then released their own photos of from Mandela’s cell. (AP Photo/The White House)

The photos on that page are visual press releases and are carefully vetted by administration employees before distribution. Such images are increasingly offered to the media by the White House in lieu of real journalistic access and we and other media organizations find this unacceptable. Media organizations generally do not reproduce written press releases verbatim, so why should we settle for these official images?

What sort of situations have the media been excluded from?
The media were prevented from documenting the President’s first day on the job – surely an historic occasion. In addition, we have been denied access to legislation being signed as well as notable foreign leaders and other visitors of interest, such as the Pakistani student activist Malala Yousafzai. In fact, since 2010 we have only been granted access to the President alone in the Oval Office on two occasions, once in 2009 and again in 2010. We have never been granted access to the President at work in the Oval Office accompanied by his staff. Previous administration regularly granted such access.

And AP isn’t the only news organization with this complaint?
The AP joined with numerous other news organizations, including all the major television networks, as well as media umbrella organizations such as APME, ASNE and the White House Correspondents’ Association to protest this diminished access in a letter to White House Press Secretary Jay Carney. In that letter we also requested a meeting with Mr. Carney to discuss the issue.

Hasn’t the AP used White House photos in the past?
We recognize that certain areas of the White House are off-limits to the media because they are secure or private areas, such as the President’s living quarters. On those occasions where something newsworthy or notable happens in these areas we sometimes distribute the official photos. Each such scenario is considered on a case-by-case basis. To be clear – we are asking to be allowed consistent, independent access into the room when the President signs legislation, greets visitors of note, or otherwise discharges his public duties.

Read a PDF of the letter to Carney.

Q&A: Uncovering the dirty cost of green energy

The Associated Press today published a major investigative report by Washington bureau journalists Dina Cappiello and Matt Apuzzo showing that the ethanol era has proved far more damaging to the environment than the government has acknowledged.

As farmers rushed to find new places to plant corn, they touched off a cascade of unintended consequences, including wiping out millions of acres of conservation land, polluting water and destroying habitat.

Ted Bridis

Ted Bridis

Here, Ted Bridis, the lead editor on the months-long investigation, describes what went into reporting the hidden, dirty cost of this green energy source:

What prompted AP to explore the topic of ethanol?
This year, among other stories, the Washington investigative team has been exploring some of the little-known costs and consequences of green energy. This project developed out of reporting by and conversations with Dina Cappiello, our excellent environmental reporter, who was “loaned” to our investigations team in the newsroom away from her everyday specialty beat responsibilities to work on some longer-term reporting efforts.

What were the most striking findings?
We were able to conservatively quantify how many acres farmers had set aside for conservation purposes but, driven in part by Washington’s biofuels mandate, had been converted to crops. The figure was at least five million acres _ more than Yellowstone, Everglades and Yosemite National Parks combined _ that have vanished on President Barack Obama’s watch.

We also conducted by computer a satellite-imagery analysis to show how many more acres of pristine grassland in the Corn Belt had been plowed into cornfields or soybeans since 2006, the year before the ethanol mandate passed. Insiders revealed to our reporters how the government’s analysis of ethanol’s carbon dioxide footprint was flawed and influenced by input from the industry. But in many ways no one in government is keeping track of its environmental toll.  

I also think one of our findings was how friendly and accommodating we found farmers and others in the Midwest when our journalists visited and explained the story we were investigating; many farmers, especially, explained they were genuinely conflicted by economic forces, chasing corn profits at the expense of continued conservation.

What were the biggest challenges you faced in reporting this project?
The tale of U.S. ethanol policy is complicated for many different audiences: farmers, motorists, policy makers, politicians, environmentalists, farmers, scientists and others. Turning months of reporting about agricultural and energy policies, scores of interviews and hefty data analyses into a narrative that readers will find compelling and informative is always a challenge.

How did you draw on AP’s resources — around the world and in the 50 states — to do it?
This project represents the efforts of dozens of AP journalists, photographers, video producers, data experts, editors and others who helped in its production

See the AP reporting here, which includes companion photos, video and a detailed interactive. Join a conversation about the AP’s reporting on ethanol today at 3 p.m. ET on Reddit.

Giarrusso to lead AP sports coverage

Michael Giarrusso

AP Global Sports Editor Michael Giarrusso (AP photo)

Today marks 100 days until the 2014 winter Olympics kick off in Sochi, Russia, and AP has named a new global sports editor to lead coverage of the games and other major events in the coming months, including the Super Bowl outside New York and the World Cup in Brazil.

Russia Sochi Olympics

In this Monday, Oct. 28, 2013 photo, workers are fixing the Olympic emblem at an entrance to the railway station of Russia’s Black Sea resort of Sochi, Russia. Russia starts 100 day count down on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013 for the 2014 Winter Olympic Games. (AP Photo/Lesya Polyakova)

In his new role, Michael Giarrusso, a former AP sports writer, news editor and state news executive, will oversee more than 100 journalists around the world and ensure that AP remains the leader in breaking sports news across formats.

What’s Giarrusso most looking forward to?

“People are consuming more sports news than they ever have before,” Giarrusso said, in newspapers and on television, smartphones and tablets. “AP sports is perfectly positioned to deliver any type of content to readers, members and customers at a moment’s notice.”

He added: “It’s so exciting to be leading this team of great journalists, and I’m honored.”

AP is already busy covering the countdown to the games, with stories on the athletes, the apparel, the politics and more.

Read more about Giarrusso and follow him on Twitter at @MichaelG1.

Gallery opening celebrates debut of Vietnam photo book

Nick_Ut

AP photographer Nick Ut stands near his iconic picture of a 9-year-old running from a napalm attack.

Crowds of journalists, photographers, distinguished guests and members of the public packed into the Steven Kasher Gallery in New York Thursday night to view iconic and rarely seen images of the Vietnam War taken by Associated Press photographers.

The exhibit showcases some of the nearly 300 images included in a new photo history book, “Vietnam: The Real War” (Abrams; Oct. 1, 2013; 304 pages; 300 photographs; US $40.00/CAN $45.00/UK £25).

Crowd

Visitors view the AP exhibit at the Steven Kasher Gallery.

Writer Pete Hamill, who penned the book’s evocative introduction, and Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Nick Ut, whose work is featured prominently in the book, were on hand to sign books at the reception. AP President and CEO Gary Pruitt, Tom Curley, former chief executive at AP, and Chairman of the Board Mary Junck were also in attendance.

The exhibit runs through Nov. 30. The gallery, located at 521 W. 23rd St. in New York, is open Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

AP is hosting other book-related events in Washington, D.C., at the Newseum on Saturday, Oct. 26, and next month in San Francisco.

AP Vietnam Photo Exhibit

Crowds attend the opening of the AP photo exhibit at the Steven Kasher Gallery (Photo by Sean Thompson)

AP Vietnam Photo Exhibit

Visitors crowd into the Steven Kasher Gallery to view the AP photo exhibit (Photo by Sean Thompson)

AP is your all access pass to New York Fashion Week

Iman

Iman is interviewed at New York Fashion Week, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013. (AP Nicole Evatt)

From the catwalk to the sidewalk, AP is your all access pass to New York Fashion Week, which runs through Sept. 12, and will be followed by events in London, Milan and Paris. Here’s a look at our multiformat coverage led by AP East Coast Entertainment & Lifestyles Editor Lisa Tolin and fashion writer Samantha Critchell:

-          AP will review and provide runway and celebrity photos from 60-plus shows.

-          Our journalists are producing 2 or more runway videos per day.

-          On Twitter, @AP_Fashion is providing color and the latest industry news.

Novek

AP’s Jocelyn Noveck interviews model Heidi Klum at New York Fashion Week. (Photo by Nicole Evatt)

-          A new interactive feature highlights behind-the-scenes images shot via Instagram by AP journalists such as entertainment producer Nicole Evatt and photographer Richard Drew.

-          All of AP’s fashion week coverage is accessible via AP Mobile, the award-winning mobile app and photo collections are available via AP Images.

“AP is always looking for new and innovative ways to cover one of the industry’s most-watched and highly anticipated events,” Tolin said. “The @AP_Fashion Twitter account and the Instagram project complement our comprehensive coverage and allow us to bring fashion fans behind the scenes and into the front row. ”